Electronic

A Deli Premiere: LOUIZA’s “Roll Your Eyes”

On April 5th, LOUIZA releases her sophomore album Swim at Night, recorded with producer James Riotto (The Mountain Goats, tUnE-yArDs, Ezra Furman) at Oakland’s Tiny Telephone. The Deli is pleased to premiere the sweet, folk-jazzy single “Roll Your Eyes.”

Swim at Night is a blend of folk, jazz, electropop and art rock. When asked about that last genre, LOUIZA’s Rebecca Mimiaga says the name allows for more experimentation. “When I think of rock, it’s so expansive…my music isn’t rock but it isn’t jazz either; it’s this total blend of all these things and I want to keep this project in the vain of ‘experimentation.’ [On this album] ...everything is more experimental [than the last]--the harmonies, everything.”

On the creation of the album itself, Mimiaga says she wants to give credit where credit is absolutely due. “With this album I’d come in with the song and a sort of mood board for what I wanted the song to be like, and Jaime (Riotto), would help determine what kind of synth sound to create. We have a lot in common sonically and he really helped determine the soundscape on the album. As for the musicians, I rarely tell them what to play, I want them to bring their own musical interest and influence to the album.” Tracks are refreshingly varied, from folk poppy rock to fantastic, horn-infused hip-hop jazz. Swim at Night is an exciting journey we recommend taking. Give it a listen and go see LOUIZA at Rickshaw Stop on April 18th for the album release show. Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor

   

Screenwriter

Screenwriter is the moniker of electronic music producer Corey Hill. It has been three years, and the release of his EP “Bather”, since we’ve seen new music from Screenwriter.

Hill recently announced that a new single called “Miriam” dropping April 19th and leading to his debut full-length later this year.

Below is “Bather”, but we will be sharing “Miriam” as soon as it is available. If you are not already, get familiar with Screenwriter.

   

PREMIERE: RVBY MY DEAR's "Draw" washes over listener and performer

Australia-by-way-of-Brooklyn artist Gabbi Coenen (known professionally as RVBY MY DEAR) lays down a not-so-quiet storm of her new single, “Draw.” The product of stress-induced sleep paralysis, “Draw” finds its strength in Coenen’s economy of movement: her confidence, as a songwriter and vocalist, resonates during the track’s introductory sequence, where Coenen’s stillness and cold crooning weaves daftly between minimalist keys and reverb-heavy claps. This isn’t to say the entirety of Coenen’s performance is based around minimalism. Rather, the careful slow build of tension over the tune’s three and a half minutes has a tendency to wash over the listener in waves of increasing intensity - similar to how water mists, then finally drenches Coenen in its music video. This drama inherent to RVBY MY DEAR’s performance is engaging, never overwhelming, and overall a deeply satisfying experience. Catch the premiere of her new video below. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt), Photo by Ebru Yildiz

   

Just a Person Doing a Thing | An Interview with Madeline Kenney

Madeline Kenney has had her hand in a lot of projects these last couple of years. Her latest album, Perfect Shapes, is a twang-hazy, dream pop collection with some killer guest stars. Produced in collaboration with Jenn Wasner (of Flock of Dimes, Wye Oak and Dirty Projectors, and with whom Kenney just released the split single The Sisters/Helpless), the album was a “synth-obsessed” production. She’s not interested in always making the same types of albums and sounds. She recognizes, too, what an honor it is to be able to play music as a core piece of her livelihood.

We met at a cafe that was blasting old crooner jams. Madeline was full of smiles, a confident-approachable attitude, and seems like someone who’d be a pleasure to work with. In an industry dominated by male energy and ego, it’s a pretty refreshing idea.

The Deli (TD): Do you think your work has been swayed by what’s going on right now? “Me too” and more women working in music engineering?

Madeline Kenney (MK): When my first record came out, this guy who interviewed me said at one point, ‘it’s a really good time for women in music right now’ and I said, ‘no offense dude, but what the fuck?’ I get where he’s coming from, but women have always been making music. Just because people pat themselves on the back for publishing more of it now doesn’t mean there’s any more or less music being made by women. Just because it’s cool now to write about women it’s just...whatever. But it turned into a great conversation that ended in us just talking about music and I’d much rather talk about that than the fact that I have a vagina.

TD: Amen. Speaking of which, you’ve been exploring new sounds, lots of synth, drum machines: can you share what gear you’ve been using?

MK: I've been using my Minilogue for everything! I also built a Subharmonicon at Moogfest last year that’s super fun. I use FunkBox on my iPhone for drum programming--it's really easy and has samples of tons of classic drum machines.

TD: Have you had any "life-changing" gear discoveries recently?

MK: I can think of several pieces of gear that changed my music! Namely my RC-30 looper pedal, which I use to write a lot. Also having a computer to record stuff with was a game-changer! Right now I'm just really into writing pretty straight-ahead guitar, vocal music, which is a change-up from my synth-obsessed 2018.

TD: So what kind of pedal(s) do you use? Can you describe your pedal set-up?

MK: Yeah, the chain is: tuner, EarthQuaker Dunes distortion, some cheap Chorus pedal, Boss PS-5 Super-Shifter, Memory Boy delay, Boss RC-30 looper, Boss DD7.

TD: What is your interest in production and engineering?

MK: I’ve made my own videos for a while and have directed for others. Before I had a budget I was shooting, directing and editing everything myself....I’d been trying to learn engineering and production--I did a lot of that at Women’s Audio Mission in San Francisco.

TD: Did you produce Perfect Shapes?

MK: We engineered the record together. It says it’s produced by her (Jenn Wasner), but it was a really collaborative effort.

TD: What other videos or projects do you have your hand in?

MK: I just produced a record for this woman, A. O Gerber, and then she had me do two music videos for her. I might be doing a music video for Rose Droll. I’m also going to be doing a video for John Vanderslice. So yeah, I’m just trying to get into that world, just a way to do something and as a way of making money. Because well, you gotta!

TD: And you shoot them yourself?

MK: I film them myself, yeah. Whatever gear I can get for the budget, I’ll use, then edit it myself. I’m not an expert--I didn’t go to school for it--but I really like doing it. And with every video project I get, I’m learning more and getting better. It’s really fun. You know what’s funny? When I was a little kid I would put on music in my room and dance around and sing to it and pretend that I was in a video. And in my brain I was like oh, too bad that’s not a real job. You can’t make videos for people, they just do it themselves. That was my idea!

TD: Do you have any advice for other musicians--especially young ones--who are trying to do this? As their job, their dreams, whatever?

MK: Thor Harris wrote this sage piece called, “How to tour in a band or whatever.” He talks about how if you’re an artist you’re essentially a nonprofit organization. You have to do something else to make money because people won’t pay for art. It’s always been that way. He’ll give you a reality check but also be like, still do this.

TD: What motivates you, when you’re really worn out? What’s your endgame?

MK: I think that anyone in this world of music needs to be hyper-aware of the fact that this is (usually) temporary. Never, ever take it for granted. But take LambChop: he’s amazing, has been making records for like 30 years, plays small venues. He’s always making new, insane-sounding things. He’s this 60 year old dude using a Vocoder auto tuner. But he works construction, too! It’s an industry where you’re either a hot hot thing, making tons of money and getting all the gigs, or, you just quietly put out a record, do your tour, and go back to your life. The latter is what I want. My end game is that slow climb: put out quality records, keep exploring new ideas and sounds. I want to always be learning new things, not just doing the same types of sounds over and over...My dream of dreams is to open my own bakery-cafe, so I can have that as my sense of permanence and then have touring or shows as a thing I continue to do, hopefully for my whole life.

-Interview with Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor

header image: 
sites/upload-files/imagecache/review_image/kin.jpg
author: 
Michelle Kicherer
Subtitle (brief and awesome): 
An Interview with Madeline Kenney
Excerpt (short interesting quote from the Q&A): 
“I’m just so tired of hearing the phrase ‘bad ass women.’ What the hell is that? It’s demeaning. We’re just people doing a thing--why can’t it just be that?”
   

Sailor Boyfriend embrace the void on “Shapes & Colors”

A post-modern philosophy informs “Shapes & Colors,” the latest single by new wave duo Sailor Boyfriend. The product of Andy Waldron and Alex Mercuri’s joint effort to comprehend the absurdity of modern existence, “Shapes” finds the two Jersey City multi-instrumentalists channeling an existential angst into blissful dance-punk - reacting not with scorn, but with joyous celebration against the Meaningless Void. Waldron’s four-on-the-floor percussion weaves around Mercuri’s syncopated guitar work, delivering a solid four minute jam accentuated by gang vocals and references to Samuel Beckett. Overall, what makes “Shapes & Colors” such an enjoyable listen is the realism of Sailor Boyfriend’s worldview that, though our lives may seem a Sisyphisian struggle, there’s still space dance ourselves clean of fatalism, even if for one fleeting moment.

“Shapes & Colors” is the title track of Sailor Boyfriend’s forthcoming sophomore effort, out April 12th on Make Believe Records. Take a listen below. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt), Photo via thesmallsoviet