Folk/Country

Briscoe Releases New Psych-Folk Single "Sailing Away"

 

They profess inspiration from both modern Americana and Van Morrison, and Briscoe hit the bullseye on their new single, “Sailing Away”. The inspirational muses are wisely chosen, too; much of Van Morrison’s early works morphed from singer/songwriter odes drenched in the warm notes of Irish folk music to psychedelic works more in line with what the Wilson brothers were cooking up - and modern Americana, as broad a genre as it may be, has a whole branch that swings down into Texas Country Rock; the two musical stylings mesh swimmingly because the writing pushes the listener to really feel what the singer is feeling, and in turn focus less on what is being said.

“Sailing Away” beams in like an easy Galveston breeze over some finely-plucked guitar strings. The first chorus lays down the groundwork for a nicely built-up second chorus that beefs up the instrumental, while the narrator’s tone is bright and saccharine. “She told me she was leavin’,” he sings with an aching drone, a wail that tugs at your shirt from behind you as you walk away.

Whether or not he just goes back to sit on that sandy and sunny European beach, our narrator surely is going to lose the girl he wants. She’s leaving, and he’s out on the ocean of his own mind, sailing away. But is shesailing away, too? Is hereally leaving her?The back-and-forth of perspective, especially when it shifts so quickly, is engaging; it lends an endearing quality to the narrator’s story, even if he is too sun-dazed to notice he’s told the same story three times.

Briscoe is the project of Austin-based musicians Philip Lupton and Truett Heintzelman. Lupton wrote “Sailing Away” and first released performance videos on his personal YouTube channel in 2017, before partnering with Heintzelman. “Sailing Away” ups the production quality from their recent releases and points them in a clearer direction going forward for more Americana surprises.

-Mike Floeck

   

Evelyn Cormier continues to blossom in new single "Little White Rabbit"

As if inside a cavern of delightful sounds and shimmering lights, Evelyn Cormier’s latest single “Little White Rabbit” is meant for exploration and admiration. The delicate acoustic guitar riffs of the song dance to resounding chords and piano notes that trickle towards the commanding vocals of Cormier, gentle and assertive all at once. The story “Little White Rabbit” tells is of separation and its accompanying heartache but also of the bravery that brews beneath the surface of that, the courage to let to go, the resolve to begin again. Cormier, the New Hampshire artist, delivers a brand of indie-folk that is immediately recognizable, and that continues to blossom; stream her latest single “Little White Rabbit” below. - Rene Cobar

   

Ian Wayne examines love in the longterm on “Baby,” new LP out 9.18

Love songs tend to be fairly focused in their subject matter, yet Queens-based folk songwriter Ian Wayne takes an eagle-eyed approach on new track “Baby,” penning a ode on an “imagined longview of life in love” that speaks the universality of the emotion. Sweetly sparse and consistently grounded, Wayne’s vox glides over a downtempo indie, almost Americana saunter, offering a plainspoken view of adoration that accepts both the good and bad in equal measure. With an economy of language and an ear for balance between the track’s winding guitar solos and a softer central voice, his capacity to render emotional intimacy in terms comprehendible to any warrant praise and a careful listen. Stream it below, and keep an ear out for Wayne’s forthcoming record Risking Illness, out September 18th on Whatever’s Clever.

   

Odd Fellows Way is all New England in new single "World's Worst Liar"

Immediately smile-inducing, the brash, fisherman’s tone of Odd Fellows Way’s latest single “World's Worst Liar” is as New England as music can get. Truly anthemic and furious-paced with drums that gallop and guitar chords that take flight, the song is bar-ready and so replayable. The lead vocal is a story told in a cheerful spirit, rough and ready to infect. Odd Fellows Way provides the type of happiness we all seek these days, and beyond that too. Listen to the butter-smooth sax that deliciously spreads itself all over the track below. - Rene Cobar, photo by Curtis Arnett

   

Dirty Bird's folk escapism reigns on new track "Eventide"

A pleasant mix of folk’s old and new trajectories, Brooklyn seven piece Dirty Bird’s new single “Eventide” seems tailor-made for periods wherein time surreptitiously passes. “Behind the shadow of the day’s final thoughts, I walk, still I’m endlessly searching for dawn,” echo the track’s vibrant refrain, a mix of soft percussive fills and an interwoven tapestry of guitars, banjo, and baroque-like vocal accents. Lush and inviting, it’s ironic that “Eventide” would make prime listening for a walk through an idyllic meadow during a period wherein we should all (still) be staying inside — for the time being it provides an acoustic reprieve that’s perfect for fans of bands like San Fermin or the Decemberists. Download it below (all proceeds go to the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund). Photo by Anthony Mulcahy