best-emerging-bands-artists

New Track: "Fall of '74" - Grimace Federation

“Fall of ’74” is the new single from Grimace Federation, which features original band member Zack Zweig on vibraphone, second drum kit and Fender Rhodes. It was recorded at Soma Studios by producer/musician John McEntire (Tortoise, Sea and Cake, Stereolab etc). A warped spin, as though a helicopter is hanging overhead, merges with the clarity of the vibraphone and the ramping up of bass, as drums launch the song into action. A free-flowing, jazz-prog aesthetic melds in the delightfully morphing, musical movement.

   

New Track: "Mystic Mountain" - Chris Forsyth

All Time Present, the forthcoming double-album from Chris Forsyth, is scheduled to arrive on April 12 via No Quarter. “Mystic Mountain” engages the ongoing spiritual journey in the search for meaning/answers. Embracing a comfort in one’s existence and surroundings, a laidback groove progresses. Amid that even-keeled march, flares of psych guitar emerge, illuminating the terrain. You can catch Forsyth’s record release show at Jerry's on Front on Saturday, April 27, supported by Garcia Peoples.

   

New Track: "march 1st." - Augusta Koch

Below is a new song, "march 1st.," from singer-songwriter Augusta Koch (Gladie, Cayetana). The reverberation of keys and the snap of percussion create a somber, intimate glow of evening. The personal narrative details experiences of dealing with a narcissist and ignoring one’s instincts. There’s a lingering sadness that has a haunting affect as she addresses past trauma and a future day of reckoning. Koch plans to release a song every Friday this month, and with this latest track, it's easy to hear why we are looking forward to listen to more.

   

Swimming Bell's "1988" is an authentic folk vision, plays Trans-Pecos 4.6

Swimming Bell, the solo project of Brooklyn-based songwriter Katie Schottland, found its start in 2015, after Schottland broke her foot and used the downtime to learn guitar. Perhaps a consequence of her homespun background in recording and composition, Swimming Bell’s music is endowed with a rare authenticity, creating raw, unfettered folk songs from memories of people and places past. Her newest effort “1988” is the latest example of this craft, accompanied by a video that seeks to recreate the innocent wonder of childhood against lush acoustics and overdubbed vocals. And as the first single from her forthcoming LP, Wild Sight, it demonstrates a focused, fresh approach to folk ahead of the album's release later this spring.

Schottland will return to New York on April 6th to perform a record release show at Trans-Pecos, supported by Monteagle, Pale Mara, and Andrew Victor. Until then, you can watch the video fro “1988” below. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt)

   

Y La Bamba: Mujeres

Y La Bamba’s latest release, Mujeres, weaves a complicated and beautiful story. Each song situates you in a space both abstract and defined. There, you and Mendoza are free to explore. As you go through the album, it expands and contracts and expands again. The limitations of memory, diving into raw and vulnerable identities, and re-imagining histories: Mujeres tackles all of these and more. In exploring her relationship to her Mexican heritage and background, Mendoza forges new spaces and histories. She challenges her audience to do the same with their own narratives. She deftly pucks your heart out of your chest and asks you to see it in a new light.

Of course, this story would be inaccessible if the narrator wasn't so dextrous and intuitive. Mendoza’s voice is at it’s strongest that we’ve seen thus far. Atmospheric and resolute, she turns each song into something that’s strikingly tangible. You can feel her hands shaping the music, akin to a potter sculpting clay. In “Perder” she sings in long, slow waves, only to end the song with hushed, repetitive muttering. The muttering continues on to the next song “Mujeres” and blends the two together. It’s masterful manipulation. It would be surprising if someone doesn't get goosebumps while listening to Mujeres.

 -By Avril Carrillo