best-emerging-bands-artists

The Deli Philly’s March Record of the Month: Holy Matrimony - Lizdelise

One naturally closes their eyes, envisioning the airy ideal described in Pictured It,” the opening track from Lizdelise’s much-anticipated album Holy Matrimony. The imagery of a futuristic fantasy shifts into drearier tone with the admission, “But I didn’t picture it right”. Confident guitar expertly intervenes, bobbing and weaving as the elegantly intimate vocals provide a soothing hypnotic counterpoint on “Tell Me”. It’s an alluring appeal toward personal connection, with a mythical, storytelling element that comes to a head with the gripping power of the questioning refrain.

A laidback, sitting-alone-in-a-room, peaceful ambiance is conveyed in “Wise,” as the smooth electro-percussive groove merges with acoustic guitar, creating a delicate harp-esque backdrop. Recalling a foreshadowing of apprehension, the song drifts between the past and the present. Amid the graceful composition, a guitar-fueled fire ignites. Reinforced by a backend bounce, “Boy” is led by another flame-throwing, infectious riff. Imagining the hypothetical and being caught at a stalemate between two difficult options. The track captures a sense of empathy within feelings of loneliness. The heartbeat gradually increases as the synth and bass unite in a climb that’s partially the calm of a head in the clouds, while revealing a sensitivity. Then, “Boy II” instrumentally punctuates explosively engulfing the aftermath. 

With “Probably Die,” a looming internal struggle generates tension, preparing for the aftershocks of a breakup before it happens. An ethereal meditation works through a personal confession. What starts as a delicate daydream begins to turn into raw, emotive energy, which is stacked higher and higher. “Interlude” releases that tension with the striking beauty of sonic fireworks.

Percussion cracks open the shell of personality as “Sated” explores one’s ever-evolving character traits and how continuous fluctuation creates detours along the road of contentment. Within the electronic swirl, the unifying, universal acceptance that we’re all on a similar voyage is countered by an unresolved anxiousness. “Twilight Sleep” instantly slips into an enchanting trance. The electro pulse and guitar shreds enter, subsequently trapping one in a lonely dream state, before “Forever” lyrically ponders the narrator’s existential purpose, and whether a sense of temporary aimlessness will linger indefinitely. While contextually not appearing on solid ground, the song retains a graceful nature.

Holy Matrimony captures a vulnerable/volatile dynamic, eloquently exploring one’s current circumstances while remaining unabashedly exposed. The trio has created an album that engages at every turn. For fans of St. Vincent and Angel Olsen, you now have a new, emerging artist to swoon over. - Michael Colavita

   

Combo Chimbita perfect tropical futurism on "Ahomale", out 05.03

Calling their music "cumbia" would only scratch the surface of Combo Chimbita’s material. On their forthcoming album Ahomale, out May 3rd, the New-York-via-Colombia group turns the entire genre, and all its preconceptions, on its head. Weaving their fondness for psychedelia, metal and punk into a sound they call “tropical futurism”, this quartet creates a vehicle through which they explore the complexities of the Afro-Latin diaspora, and with which they imagine a stunning and prophetic destiny. Not only is their musical intent ambitious, Combo Chimbita has the musical chops to carry it through - the songs on Ahomale are driven, vivacious, and uncompromising. Check out their first single “Brillo Más Que El Oro (La Bala Apuntándome)” below, and don’t miss their show at Elsewhere on May 4th. -Sunny Betz

   

New Track: "Heavy Water/I'd Rather Be Sleeping" (Grouper Cover) - Nothing

Nothing just announced that they'll be releasing a new compilation album, titled Spirit Of The Stairs - B-Sides & Rarities (Relapse Records). It will feature outtakes from their latest LP Dance On The Blacktop, along with other demos, live recordings, and covers. Below is the band's beautifully noisy rendition of Grouper's genteel "Heavy Water/I'd Rather Be Sleeping". Nothing have plans to return back to Philly on Tuesday, May 14 at the TLA, with Basement & Teenage Wrist.

   

Haulm craft brooding, minimal synthpop on "Posture," play SXSW

Posture, the sophomore EP by Brooklyn's atmospheric synthpop duo Haulm, features an aged desert landscape contained within a thick white border. It’s a perfect fit for the brooding, dark, and spartan work laid down over the release’s five tracks; one can almost picture an unknown beast slouching from the sandy landscape against the dissonant keys of Reed Kackley, as JT Norton’s distant, almost fugue-state vocals weaves in and out. It’s an EP oozing with atmosphere that’s curated using relatively few musical elements, and speaks volumes to Haulm’s penchant for fine tuning sparse synths and the human voice into engaging, mysterious soundscapes.

You can catch Haulm at SXSW on March 12th and 15th - until then, stream Posture below. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt)

   

Ziemba invites listeners to to utopia with concept album Ardis, 04.04/ 06.06

Most bands chose to include a visual element with a new release, but while it's normal to expect album artwork or a music video, few would also expect to receive a scented candle as a part of the package. Rene Zladzyk of Ziemba delivers all three items with her project Ardis, an all encompassing "brain-pop" electronic project that imagines a futuristic utopia, complete with fragrance to match. Drawing on her own interest in feminist geography (and the sound of classic Brian Eno albums from the mid '70s), Zladzyk beckons listeners into the fully realized world of Ardis, but the songs themselves reveal that not all is as it seems, in paradise. Instead, the tracks reflect back on our world, illuminating the faults of Earth in contrast to what could be. The Ardis project is a triage - part one was released on February 12th, with parts two and three to follow on April 4th and June 6th. Check out the first installment, and the world of Ardis, below. - Sunny Betz